Thank You and Good Night

Travelling the Silicon Road

HONG KONG — Boy oh boy, what a place to end a month-long Chinese sojourn. I arrived here this afternoon; the sun is setting on my last night in China.

But then Hong Kong isn’t really China, in the same sense that San Francisco isn’t really the United States. It’s in the United States, but it isn’t an American city. Just like no country can really claim its bustling port cities as their own, it’s clear even after just a few hours that Hong Kong is a unique place. Hong Kong isn’t Chinese, it’s Hong Kong.

There is every flavor of human being here; a true international city if there ever was one. And it’s a shame I will only be spending about 24 hours here. Of course, one could get into a lot of trouble in a place like this in only 24 hours, and normally I would be more than willing.

But it is a rather bemused and bittersweet feeling I have at the moment. Like I said previously, I feel like the task of unraveling this fascinating, wonderful land has only just begun. It’s true that I’ve had enough business travel to last me awhile, and after wandering the streets of Hong Kong for a few hours, I can’t help but long for the solitude and wide open space that will greet me when I return home later next week.

And Lord so help me, I think I would consider murder in cold blood if I thought it would get me a decent burrito a few hours sooner.

Nevertheless, all things considered, if I had the opportunity and the world were a different place, I’d stay. For how long, I don’t know. As long as I want to, I suppose. If Reed Business were to offer me a correspondent position in China, and they said I could live where I want to, I’d take it in heart beat. If they said I had to live in Beijing or Shanghai, I’d have to think about it for awhile — not very long, likely — and the answer would probably be yes.

I’m not saying I want to spend the rest of my life here — there is that whole free speech thing, I have issues with — but then I can’t say that about anywhere, really. Not even Ireland, which is the only other foreign place to tug at my heart strings like China has. But for a time. …

Anyway, I was a day late arriving in Hong Kong, where I was scheduled to spend the weekend before returning back to the States, with only a day to spare on my visa. Why did I skip an extra day in Hong Kong to remain an extra day in Shenzhen?

Well, Dear Gentle Readers, you don’t get to hear that part of the story. Suffice it to say, my soul longs to return to Gulang Yu or Beijing, and I have no doubt left my stomach in Chengdu, probably for all-time (although I haven’t been to Italy or Thailand — yet). But just when I thought I was going to escape a month in China relatively unscathed, it turns out that I’ll be leaving a little piece of my heart in Shenzhen. A tiny piece, but a piece nonetheless.

And for those of you that know Shenzhen, get your minds out of the gutter, it’s not what you think; I’m not talking about any of Shenzhen’s legendary working girls. No, Ali … she is anything but that.

I even thought about staying tonight in Shenzhen and getting up early and going straight to the Hong Kong airport. But I figured that, even though I have no interviews or appointments in Hong Kong, it was still part of my job to come here and experience it. And it’s a good thing I did, because it took hours to travel the 30 some kilometers from downtown Shenzhen to downtown Hong Kong.

This brings us all the way back around full circle to the subject at hand, finding out the truth of China.

But that will have to wait until next week. After all, it is Saturday night, and I am in Hong Kong. I’m not that bemused.

Electronic News Travels to ChinaWhat, you thought this was it? Oh no, the voyage down the Silicon Road will continue long after I’ve returned to the States. There are more stories to write about China, and more blog topics, like the long list of people I want to thank.

Why for heaven’s sake, we haven’t even gotten yet to what I know many Westerners want to know about: public restrooms and pit toilets. How could you think we were done?

Stay tuned.

Jeff

Editor’s Note: As explained at length elsewhere on this site, this is a blog entry of mine that originally appeared on the now-defunct Electronic News’ website, which is long gone. While its former sister pub Electronic Design News (EDN) currently holds the copyright to all Electronic News copy (to the best of my knowledge), as far as I know, this blog content isn’t hosted anywhere else on the Internet, hence my reproduction here.

Original Comments

at 11/7/2005 7:36:42 AM, PeteF said:

I’ve enjoyed this series very much. As a student of Chinese history I envy your opportunity to visit there. And I must compliment you; you were not an ugly american. You are a real traveler. I’m going to be looking forward to more of your work. The writing is quick, entertaining and insightful. You done good boy!

at 11/7/2005 12:37:29 PM, Wayne V said:

Jeff, just a short note to tell you how much I have enjoyed your reports from China. Definitely first hand and first rate! Have a safe trip home and I look forward to hearing more about your trip! Wayne V

at 11/7/2005 2:09:45 PM, Jim from Rhinebeck said:

I’ve read bits and pieces of your blog; have enjoyed, and agree with, your perspectives. I’ve been to Shanghai on and off, for 10 years, to attend Semicon China trade shows. It’s amzing to see Shanghai’s transformation in that time, when the Pearl tower was the only really tall structure in the city scape. Now, Shanghai boasts a skyscraper a day and a 430 km/hr ride on the mag-lev.

Jeff, if only you could have seen the bicycle traffic in 1995! So much of that traffic has moved to the subway. This past March was my first endeaver to see other cities in China; Beijing, Xian, Shanghai, and Hong Kong. Seemingly endless examples of cultural, social, and political juxtaposition. My Beijing business associate (friend/guide/translator) survived the Cultural Revolution, and is now quite proud to own his own home and car.

China, for all its complexities and contradictions, is modernizing at an unfathomable rate. It’s a 21st century version of the California gold-rush. Enough of the profound. Time and Newsweek covered the profundities in detail. Simply put, China is a great place to visit. An when you’re done, you’ll be wishing Chinese foot massage parlors in the US.

at 11/7/2005 2:13:04 PM, Phil Harris said:

Having recently returned from a 2 week stay in Beijing, I found the people friendly, warm, and very helpful. My coworkers were enthusiastic and recognized that I brought information on well established western procedures. It was also an opportunity for me to learn that business in China has some similarities and differences. I hope to make this trip again shortly and look forward to it except for the plane ride. That leaves a lot to be desired. Thanks for your perspective. Phil

at 11/7/2005 2:14:43 PM, C.C.Poon said:

All the tour articles make very interesting reading. Worth many times over the money spent (by whoever)on the trip. I look forward to reading the other articles yet to come. Many thanks for writing them, Jeff.

at 11/11/2005 8:49:12 AM, Pete Flynn said:

Jeff, I want to let you know that this series has been great. I’ve enjoyed every post and even most of the comments by other readers. Even the dopey ones.Since I work for a company that sells lots of “stuff” to the Chinese electronics industry, their success means I keep working. I see the global integration of China ultimately resulting in more freedom for the Chinese people and a reduction in tensions. I will look forward to more of your articles.